Chocolate company in bitter logo battle

10550922_918599081530600_185100523357497172_nA small Adelaide chocolate company has been forced to change its business logo after threats of legal action from fashion giant Chanel.

The issue was sparked when Chocolate @ No.5, located at Hahndorf in the Adelaide Hills, tried to trademark its logo and was contacted by Chanel’s lawyer who opposed the registration.

With her business located at number five in Hahndorf’s Main Street, owner Alison Peck said she could have challenged Chanel’s arguments but decided instead to redesign her logo.

AAP

Comments

4 comments

  1. bigvic posted on June 25, 2015

    I hate fakes and copy garments. But this is ridiculous. it's clearly a blend of the word Chocolate and 5 and nothing in the design reminded me of Chanel whatsoever. and i reckon 999 out of 1000 would agree with me. If not more. You have to admire small handcrafted Australian operations in any field. i'm sure it's not easy for these chocolatiers. How about a Social Media campaign to support Alison and her team? and another Social Media campaign to tell Chanel to stop bullying these people?

  2. Stuart Bennie posted on June 25, 2015

    Bigvic, I couldn't agree more. Bizarre. Let me know the social media and I will gladly join Stuart

  3. Tim Williams posted on June 26, 2015

    But surely Chanel have worldwide exclusivity to the number 5. Having used it for their perfume, they must have a case for 5 to be removed from house numbers, telephone numbers, post office box numbers, not to mention withdrawing all 5 dollar notes and 5 cent pieces. There are so many copycat attempts on their iconic perfume brand. It's good to see them finally taking a stand.

  4. Kathryn Holt posted on June 29, 2015

    the logo pictured is the new one. the old one was "Chocolate no. 5" and probably did trade on the recognisability of the Chanel brand. Whether it should have stirred their legal team into action is another matter. I feel for the proprietor - the expense involved in rebranding is not something a small business can readily absorb.

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